Should I Give A Recorded Statement to the Other Insurance Company?

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Should I Give A Recorded Statement to the Other Insurance Company?

After a car accident, you might wonder, “Should I give a recorded statement to the other insurance company?”  The short answer is NO!!!

Have you ever called a company and been warned that the call may be recorded for quality assurance?  Guess what.  Every single call to an insurance company is recorded.  However, there is a huge difference between having a general phone call recorded and giving a recorded statement.

Typically, your first call to an insurance adjuster after a car accident will involve the insurance adjuster asking you basic questions such as where, when and how your car or motorcycle accident happened.

The adjuster will also ask you about any injuries you may have sustained to your neck, back, etc. Most people don’t realize it, but the insurance adjuster is usually writing notes and treating the initial conversation as a trial run for your upcoming recorded statement.

After you have answered the insurance adjuster’s questions, the adjuster will typically say that they would now like to formally record your statement. Many adjusters will attempt to downplay the recorded statement by saying that they are just going to ask you the same questions again.

Once you have given your permission, the adjuster will start a recording and ask you most, but not all, of the questions they asked you just a few moments ago.

“The insurance adjuster will have a pretty good idea of how you will respond to their questions.”

Because the insurance adjuster already asked you many of the key questions “off the record,” the insurance adjuster will have a pretty good idea of how you will respond to their questions.

Many personal injury insurance adjusters will gloss over or completely skip questions that make their client appear to be at fault.

Insurance adjusters view you as a file number and will treat your case as a business expense.  Their goal is to make your case go away for as cheap as possible.

For example, an insurance adjuster will typically ask a personal injury victim to state all of their injuries during the recorded statement.

The adjuster will often follow up their question about your injuries by saying something like, “So, is that all of your injuries?”

If the accident was very recent, there’s a decent chance that you still have adrenaline running through your veins, which could potentially cause you to overlook some of your minor injuries.

For example, if you broke your arm in a car accident you would probably focus on the pain in your arm when you gave your recorded statement.  However, if you would probably start to notice pain in your neck or back within a few days of your car accident.

You might have a hard time proving your other injuries in your case if you clearly said that you only had pain in your arm when you gave your recorded statement.

“There is a significant risk that you might give information that could harm your case.”

Unless you have a tremendous amount of experience related to recorded statements in personal injury lawsuits, there is a significant risk that you might give information, during a recorded statement, that could harm your personal injury case.

Allbee Law Firm has the knowledge and experience to coach you on how to give an excellent recorded statement to the other insurance company and, in most cases, avoid giving a recorded statement at all.

We give free consultations, so call us at (817) BIG-MIKE and find out if you have a case and what your legal options are.

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Allen Arlington Bedford Burleson Carrollton Cedar Hill Cleburne Dallas Denton Fort Worth Frisco Garland Grand Prairie Haltom City Irving Lewisville Mansfield McKinney Mesquite Midlothian North Richland Hills Plano Richardson Waxahachie Weatherford

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Kris

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